MOST RELEVANT RESULT(S) FOR :

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 Review: Top-ranking Four-Thirds sensor

By Paul Carroll - Friday October 16 2015

Sensor Review
Introduction | Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 Measurement: New sensor just ahead | Comparison: GX8 vs Samsung NX500 vs Sony A6000 | Conclusion
Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 Review: Top-ranking Four-Thirds sensor

Launched in July 2015, the $1,198 GX8 is Panasonic’s latest Micro-Four-Thirds mirrorless hybrid camera. Announced as an update to its predecessor, the GX7, the GX8 becomes the highest-resolution Micro-Four-Thirds offering in the Panasonic lineup, featuring a 20Mp Live MOS sensor.

Along with high-resolution 20Mp (5184 x 3888 pixel) stills, the new sensor can also capture 4K video at 24/25p or full HD movies at 50/25p. Another first for the GX8 is the inclusion of a new Dual I.S (Image Stabilization) system, with mechanisms built into both the camera and the lens to enhance performance. Thanks to its new Dual I.S. system, Panasonic claims up to 3.5 stops of “anti-shake” on the GX8 when using wide-angle focal lengths.

The GX8’s weather-sealed construction offers splash- and dust-proof construction to handle difficult shooting environments, and boasts a wide ISO 100 to 25600 sensitivity range, as well as 8fps burst shooting. Featuring a built-in pop-up flash, electronic viewfinder, free-angle LCD, hotshoe for external flash, and compatibility with a wide range of Micro-Four Third-lenses, the new GX8 looks like an enticing all-in-one shooting proposition for the hybrid enthusiast. Let’s see how its sensor scores compare in our benchmark image quality lab tests.

 

Key features & specifications

  • 20.3Mp (5184 x 3888 px) Four-Thirds Live MOS sensor
  • 4K video @ 24/25p and HD video @ 50/25p
  • Dual Image Stabilization
  • 3.0-inch 1040k dot free-angle LCD
  • Contrast Detect AF system
  • OLED EVF
  • 8fps burst shooting
  • Built-in flash
  • Wi-Fi & NFC connectivity

Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 Measurement: New sensor just ahead

Comparison: GX8 vs Samsung NX500 vs Sony A6000

Conclusion