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Xiaomi 11T Display review: Accurate colors

Reading Time: 5 min read
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display

The Xiaomi 11T arrived on the market in October 2021 and comes with a number of attractive features, including a 108 MP main camera. Let’s take a look at how it did in our DXOMARK display tests.

Key display specifications:

  • 6.67-inch OLED display
  • 164.1 x 76.9 x 8.8 mm (6.46 x 3.03 x 0.35 inches)
  • Resolution: 1080 x 2400 (395 ppi)
  • Aspect ratio: 20:9
  • Refresh rate: 120 Hz
  • MediaTek Dimensity 1200 5G (6 nm)

About DXOMARK Display tests: For scoring and analysis in our smartphone and other display reviews, DXOMARK engineers perform a variety of objective and perceptual tests under controlled lab and real-life conditions. This article highlights the most important results of our testing. Note that we evaluate display attributes using only the device’s built-in display hardware and its still image (gallery) and video apps at their default settings. (For in-depth information about how we evaluate smartphone and other displays, check out our articles, “How DXOMARK tests display quality” and “A closer look at DXOMARK Display testing.”)

Test summary

Xiaomi 11T
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display

Pros

  • Colors are accurate in most tested conditions.
  • Good video rendering for HDR10 content.
  • Smooth touch and no frame drops when gaming.

Cons

  • Lack of smoothness when browsing web pages and viewing photos in the gallery.
  • Undersaturated colors in low-light conditions.
  • Slight grayish haze on dark tones in HDR10 videos.

The Xiaomi 11T is adapted to general uses, with great readability and color reproduction in most tested lighting conditions. Although not perfect with dark content, the device provides a satisfying experience when watching HDR10 videos, with only few frame drops. All in all, it is the best among our high-end segment and surprisingly comes in 2 points ahead of the Pro version that claims to have the same display specs (see details in the readability section).

Brightness vs Contrast comparison (0 Lux)
Brightness vs Contrast comparison (30 000 Lux)

Indoors, the device lacks brightness and details in the darker shades.

Readability indoors, from left to right: Xiaomi 11T, Xiaomi Mi 11, Samsung Galaxy A52 5G, Oppo Reno5 Pro 5G
(Photo credit: DXOMARK; for illustration only)
Outdoors, our engineers measured the 11T’s brightness at over 1000 nits, which is impressive; nonetheless, the Xiaomi 11T remains hard to read under sunlight.
Brightness under sunlight, from left to right: Xiaomi 11T, Xiaomi Mi 11, Samsung Galaxy A52 5G, Oppo Reno5 Pro 5G
(Photo credit: DXOMARK; for illustration only)
Our engineers compared the behavior of the Xiaomi 11T and the Xiaomi 11T Pro when illuminated by a strong light source. They placed the devices in indoor conditions and pointed a spotlight at the devices’ ambient light sensors, with very interesting results. You can see that the 11T’s rendering on the left remains natural-looking in both images, while strong artifacts are visible in the ones viewed on the Xiaomi 11T Pro on the right.
Indoors, high brightness: Xiaomi 11T (left), Xiaomi 11T Pro (right)
(Photo credit: DXOMARK; for illustration only)
Indoors, high brightness: Xiaomi 11T (left), Xiaomi 11T Pro (right)
(Photo credit: DXOMARK; for illustration only)
Indoors, high brightness (closeup): Xiaomi 11T (left), Xiaomi 11T Pro (right); details are preserved under bright light
(Photo credit: DXOMARK; for illustration only)
Indoors, high brightness (closeup): Xiaomi 11T (left), Xiaomi 11T Pro (right)
(Photo credit: DXOMARK; for illustration only)

In addition, the engineers measured the gamma of both devices under sunlight. The Gamma 2.2 curve corresponds to the standard gamma measurement expected for sRGB and Display-P3 images in a dark room, and has been added to the graph for reference. The 11T has a smoother curve than the 11T Pro, resulting in better-conserved local contrasts and details.

Gamma curve comparison, Xiaomi 11T and Xiaomi 11T Pro
As for color, a greenish cast is noticeable on content when viewed in indoor lighting conditions:
Color rendering indoors, clockwise from top left: Xiaomi 11T, Xiaomi Mi 11, Samsung Galaxy A52 5G, Oppo Reno5 Pro 5G.
(Photo credit: DXOMARK; for illustration only)
The left-hand chart below shows the Xiaomi 11T’s color fidelity in the P3 color space at 1000 lux, illustrating correct color reproduction with an average JNCD of 3 in the P3 color space. The center of each circle is the target color; the further the tip of the arrow is outside of the circle, the more users will notice the difference between the color on the display and the original color of the source material. The scatter chart on the right shows the 11T’s strong shift toward green when holding it at different angles.
Xiaomi 11T, color fidelity at 1000 lux in the P3 color space
Xiaomi 11T, scatter graph of white point on angle

The Xiaomi 11T’s video brightness is well suited for watching HDR10 content, although mid-tones lack a bit of contrast. Darker shades are visible but there is a slight grey haze on the content. There is a blueish cast on content, including on skin tones, though the rendering remains acceptable.

Video color, clockwise from top left: Xiaomi 11T, Xiaomi Mi 11, Samsung Galaxy A52 5G, Oppo Reno5 Pro 5G
(Photo credit: DXOMARK; for illustration only)

When comparing the Xiaomi 11T with the 11T Pro, our engineers noticed that even though the Xiaomi 11T Pro is brighter overall, its dark tones are dimmer and are harder to see than those on the 11T. In the example below, the Xiaomi 11T is on top and the Xiaomi 11T Pro is on the bottom. Dark tones are more visible on the Xiaomi 11T than they are on the Xiaomi 11T Pro (particularly in the sky and on the left side of the photo).

Video dark tones: Xiaomi 11T (top), Xiaomi 11T Pro (bottom)
(Photo credit: DXOMARK; for illustration only)

The EOTF (Electro-Optical Transfer Function) describes how the video data is converted to a particular brightness on the screen. The PQ (Perceptual Quantizer) is the standard EOTF of the HDR10 video format, and represents the tone mapping of the videos. The EOTF measurement of the 11T and the 11T Pro in a dark room confirmed the perceptual evaluation: the darker shades are brighter on the 11T compared to the 11T Pro despite a lower peak brightness. On the Xiaomi 11T, darker details are more visible but flattened, explaining the noticeable grey haze. To preserve a similar artistic intent, we expect measured the EOTF curve to have the same shape as the PQ standard, although less bright since it is measured in low light.

Xiaomi 11T and Xiaomi 11T Pro, HDR10 EOTF measurements under 0 lux of white.

The Xiaomi 11T shows frame drops and stutters at both 30 fps and 60 fps, as shown below; however, no frame drops were noticeable while playing video games. After using the slider, there is a slight delay before the video resumes.

Xiaomi 11T, frame drops at 30 fps
Xiaomi 11T, frame drops at 60 fps

The device is fairly smooth when browsing the web and when scrolling in the gallery, but some frame duplications and frame drops occur from time to time.

Despite being responsive to ghost touches and showing a bit of aliasing (see Xiaomi 11T and Xiaomi 11T Pro comparison below), the Xiaomi 11T offers a pleasant experience overall when gaming.

Aliasing closeup, Xiaomi 11T
(Photo credit: DXOMARK; for illustration only)
Aliasing closeup, Xiaomi 11T Pro
(Photo credit: DXOMARK; for illustration only)

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